Invention of the Year: Kids’ Motion Sickness Goggles

My family has logged an inordinate number of hours this summer on various US highways, byways, and the occasional gravel trail. We’ve gone from the mountains to the sea and several places in between. I wish I could say all this travel was for fun, but sadly that’s not been much of the case.

However, it could have been worse. (This post includes affiliate links)

Far, far, worse.

My eldest son suffers from acute motion sickness and we’ve spent the last ten years honing our senses in order to detect the little signs and giveaways that indicate that it is either time to pull over or locate a makeshift barf bag. The signs are subtle. First, there is the unnatural quiet that descends upon the back seat. Then there is the closing and stowing of electronics or the howl of wind from a rear window cracking over. Ignore any of these signs at your peril.

I didn’t know then that I would be spending so much of this summer on the road, but whether by coincidence or providence, I decided I’d had enough after nearly being christened again following a long drive into the mountains. I recalled seeing an ad with a set of funny-looking goggles appear in a browser search months upon months ago claiming to relieve motion sickness. I’d dismissed them at the time as nothing more than yet another way to separate me from my money, but at that moment, seeing my boy’s normally happy face take on a shade of pale green (yet again), I decided to give it another look.

“Order them mom,” my son begged.

Who would have thought something so small could have such a big impact

And so I did. A few weeks later, the goggles arrived in a narrow tube. I call them goggles and not glasses as there is nothing in the four rims (two in the front, another one on each side) other than a thin chamber containing a blue liquid. The frames themselves are made of a thick rubbery plastic that bends and makes you wonder how well the device can actually stay up on a child’s ears.

However, somehow they do.

Even better, after forcing him to wear them for ten minutes at a time for one long car trip after another, I am happy to say they somehow work too!

The downside is now my son’s ravenous appetite is still in full effect from journey start to journey end. This has done a number on our travel meal budget as he used to not be able to stand the sight or smell of food for at least an hour after we finally put the car in park, but I suppose I prefer cleaning out a few extra snack wrappers to the alternative.

We may still have miles and miles to go before we sleep, but at least, thankfully, we don’t have to immediately find the laundry machine when we get there.

13 thoughts on “Invention of the Year: Kids’ Motion Sickness Goggles

  1. Interesting! I wonder if the fluid is giving the eyes something that’s stationary rather than the apparently moving environment seen outside the car. Glad they helped! I wonder if they’d also work with sea sickness when the person is actually moving back and forth.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I must look into these, Ally, as Michael gets very motion sick too. He was ill on our flight to the UK despite the motion sickness tablets which he and I both take. ON the way back we also used the pressure point wrist band which seemed to help as he didn’t vomit.

    Liked by 1 person

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